September 11th, 2021 at 10:29 PM by admin

He appears to be trying to avoid the backstop in other ways, either by trying to renegotiate the deal with the EU or by leaving the EU without a deal. Many experts are skeptical about the extent to which technology is the “answer” to the border problem. In March 2018, the Northern Ireland Affairs Select Committee concluded in a report on the border between Ireland and the NI: “We have not seen anywhere in the world technical solutions that, beyond the goal, would eliminate the need for physical infrastructure at the border.” Jill Rutter of the Institute for Government has created a blog in which she lashs out at the different types of solutions that could end the backstop. The Irish border has been eliminated by both Britain and the EU because of its importance to the peace process in Northern Ireland for a backstop. The Good Friday Agreement of 1998 was an important element of this peace process. One of the three main points of the agreement was the creation of infrastructure for “North-South cooperation” between the Irish Government and the newly created Northern Ireland Assembly. In other words, the UK could not leave the Irish backstop if the EU felt that an alternative solution would not work. Prior to this agreement, a long period of conflict had lasted since the 1920s, known as The Troubles in the second half of the twentieth century. Both the EU and the UK said they didn`t want the backstop to be used, but that wasn`t enough security for some MPs who thought the backstop could mean the UK would remain closely tied to the EU indefinitely. Article 185 of the Withdrawal Agreement states that the Protocol will apply “from the end of the transitional period” (i.e. after 31 December 2020).

The backstop therefore automatically comes into force; There is no active process that “triggers” it. There is another avenue: the party wishing to terminate the backstop may request the independent arbitration panel established by the agreement to review the Joint Committee`s decision. However, the government`s legal situation on the Withdrawal Agreement makes it clear that the body would not consider evidence submitted by one party, but whether that evidence was examined in good faith by the other party. During the Brexit negotiations, the European Union listened to the Irish government, which would mean the return of a hard border, insisting that any withdrawal agreement contain a backstop. He said the backstop could be replaced by other regulations to avoid the need for physical checks at the Irish border, but did not specify the wording of those agreements. According to the draft withdrawal agreement, the UK would enter a “transition period” after Brexit (currently scheduled for 31 October 2019). This article has been updated to cover the latest political developments around the backstop. The backstop has been abolished and replaced with plans that protect the “historical ties and enduring nature of bilateral relations between Ireland and the United Kingdom.” . . . .